Unit Plan

Analyzing the Elements of Fiction and Literary Nonfiction

Objectives

This unit builds on students’ prior knowledge of fiction and nonfiction to focus on literary elements in fiction and literary nonfiction, and on text structure in informational texts. Students will:

  • review literary elements in fiction and literary nonfiction.
  • identify and analyze character, plot, and setting.
  • explain how a character’s actions impact the events in a story.
  • use and cite evidence from texts to support inferences and conclusions.
  • analyze point of view to support comprehension of fiction and literary nonfiction.

Essential Questions

  • How does interaction with text provoke thinking and response?
  • How do strategic readers create meaning from informational and literary text?
  • What is this text really about?

Related Unit and Lesson Plans

Related Materials & Resources

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Formative Assessment

  • View

    Multiple-Choice Items:

    1. Which element of literary text structure identifies where the story takes place?

    A

    character

    B

    setting

    C

    problem

    D

    solution

     

    1. Which element helps the reader determine how a character is feeling?

    A

    actions

    B

    problems

    C

    solution

    D

    outcome

     

    Multiple-Choice Answer Key:

    1. B, 2. A

     

     

    Short-Answer Item:

    Explain how changing the point of view can affect a story. Give two specific examples using a story we have read.

    Short-Answer Key and Scoring Rubric:

    Changing the point of view gives you a different view of the story. If the story is told in the third person, you may know the thoughts and feelings of many characters. If the story is told in the first person, you know the thoughts and feelings of only one character.

     

    Points

    Description

    3

    Student analyzes and explains how changing the point of view changes the story, and two specific examples are given to support the explanation.

    2

    Student analyzes and explains how changing the point of view changes the story, and at least one example is given to support the explanation.

    1

    Student analyzes and explains how changing the point of view changes the story, but no examples are given. OR Student gives a weak explanation of how changing the point of view changes the story, and an example is given.

    0

    Student demonstrates a lack of understanding of the prompt or makes no attempt to complete the prompt.

     

    Performance Assessment:

    Have students choose one of the following tasks:

    1. Read a fiction text and a literary nonfiction text. Identify the point of view in each text. Make a chart to show how the point of view is similar or different in the two types of texts.
    2. Choose one of the books from this unit. Make a poster for a sequel to the book from another point of view. Design the poster so that the illustrations clearly indicate from whose point of view the story is told. Include essential details that indicate the character’s feelings.

     

    Performance Assessment Scoring Rubric:

     

    Points

    Description

    3

    Student completes one of the performance tasks and accurately identifies point of view in fiction or literary nonfiction.

    2

    Student completes one of the performance tasks and indicates some understanding of point of view but does not accurately identify or support the correct point of view.

    1

    Student completes one of the performance tasks but does understand point of view.

    0

    Student demonstrates a lack of understanding of the task or makes no attempt to complete the task.

Final 03/01/2013
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