Lesson Plan

Analyzing Key Ideas and Details Through the Use of Facts and Opinions

Objectives

In this lesson, students will explore the use of facts and opinions in nonfiction texts. Students will:

  • distinguish between a fact and an opinion.
  • support differentiation between fact and opinion with text-based evidence.
  • identify why facts and opinions are used in nonfiction writing.

Essential Questions

How do strategic readers create meaning from informational and literary text?
How does interaction with text provoke thinking and response?
What is this text really about?
  • How do strategic readers create meaning from informational and literary text?
  • What is this text really about?
  • How does interaction with text provoke thinking and response?

Vocabulary

  • Nonfiction: Writing that is not fictional; designed to explain, argue, instruct, or describe rather than entertain.
  • Fact: Information that can be proved.
  • Opinion: A belief or conclusion that cannot be proved.

Duration

60–90 minutes/2–3 class periods

Prerequisite Skills

Prerequisite Skills haven't been entered into the lesson plan.

Materials

  • nonfiction books at students’ reading levels, which have easily identifiable facts and opinions, one per student. Some examples include the following:
    • Science Vocabulary Readers by Scholastic Inc.
    • Emergent Science Readers by Scholastic Inc.
    • World Discovery History Readers by Scholastic Inc.
    • The Usborne Internet-Linked Introduction to Weather & Climate Change by Kristeen Rogers. Usborne Publishing Ltd., 2003.
    • Butterfly and Moth (Eyewitness Books) by Paul Whalley. Dorling Kindersley Ltd., 2000.
    • A Picture Book of Anne Frank by David A. Adler. Holiday House Inc., 1994.
    • Rosa Parks (Rookie Biographies) by Wil Mara. Children’s Press, 2007.
      • Teachers may substitute other books to provide a range of reading and level of       text complexity. Alternative books should be nonfiction texts with easily           identifiable facts and opinions.
  • Fact and Opinion Cards (L-3-4-3_Fact and Opinion Cards.docx)
  • Stingray Passage (L-3-4-3 Stingray Passage.docx), one copy to read aloud to students
  • copies of Fact or Opinion worksheet (L-3-4-3_Fact or Opinion Worksheet.docx)
  • sticky notes
  • index cards (one per student) with fact written on one side and opinion written on the other side

Related Unit and Lesson Plans

Related Materials & Resources

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  • nonfiction books at students’ reading levels, which have easily identifiable facts and opinions, one per student. Some examples include the following:
    • Science Vocabulary Readers by Scholastic Inc.
    • Emergent Science Readers by Scholastic Inc.
    • World Discovery History Readers by Scholastic Inc.
    • The Usborne Internet-Linked Introduction to Weather & Climate Change by Kristeen Rogers. Usborne Publishing Ltd., 2003.
    • Butterfly and Moth (Eyewitness Books) by Paul Whalley. Dorling Kindersley Ltd., 2000.
    • A Picture Book of Anne Frank by David A. Adler. Holiday House Inc., 1994.
    • Rosa Parks (Rookie Biographies) by Wil Mara. Children’s Press, 2007.
      • Teachers may substitute other books to provide a range of reading and level of       text complexity. Alternative books should be nonfiction texts with easily           identifiable facts and opinions.
  • Fact and Opinion Cards (L-3-4-3_Fact and Opinion Cards.docx)
  • Stingray Passage (L-3-4-3 Stingray Passage.docx), one copy to read aloud to students
  • copies of Fact or Opinion worksheet (L-3-4-3_Fact or Opinion Worksheet.docx)
  • sticky notes
  • index cards (one per student) with fact written on one side and opinion written on the other side

Formative Assessment

  • View

    The goal of this lesson is to build on students’ understanding of facts and opinions and identify why they are used in nonfiction text.

    • To assess students’ understanding of the concepts, have students complete the Fact or Opinion Worksheet (L-3-4-3_Fact or Opinion Worksheet.docx). Collect and grade the sheet to determine if each student can meet the goal of understanding facts and opinions and how they are used in nonfiction text. Provide additional instruction if needed.
    • Observe students during their discussions with partners. Evaluate students’ ability to do the following:
      • identify and differentiate between facts and opinions.
      • understand how facts and opinions are used in nonfiction texts.

Suggested Instructional Supports

  • View
    Scaffolding, Active Engagement, Modeling, Explicit Instruction
    W: Review the terms fact and opinion through a class game. 
    H: Have students work together to find examples of facts and opinions in nonfiction text. 
    E: Help students determine whether they have correctly identified examples of facts and opinions 
    R: Provide opportunities for students to discuss with a partner what they have found and then share with the larger group. Encourage students to defend their decision or to change it. 
    E: Observe students to assess their understanding of fact and opinion when reading nonfiction text and give students an opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned. 
    T: Provide opportunities for students to demonstrate understanding of fact and  opinion when reading a nonfiction text as an independent activity and in small-group and large-group participation. 
    O: The learning activities in this lesson provide for large-group instruction and discussion, small-group exploration, partner interaction, and individual application of the concepts. 

Instructional Procedures

  • View

    Focus Question: How can a reader determine what is fact and what is opinion when reading nonfiction texts?

    Display a two-column chart on the board/chart paper/interactive whiteboard. Spread out the Fact and Opinion Cards (L-3-4-3_Fact and Opinion Cards.docx). Give students time to read the cards.

    • Choose a fact card and tape it in the left column on the chart. Then choose an opinion card and tape it in the right column on the chart.
    • Have students sort the remaining cards and tape them in the appropriate columns on the chart. Ask students how the cards have been sorted. Help students come to the conclusion that one column has facts and the other column has opinions. If students struggle with sorting the cards, provide labels for the columns first, and then proceed with the activity.
    • Write Facts at the top of the left column and Opinions at the top of the right column. Encourage students to use the chart for reference throughout the lesson.
    • Ask students the difference between a fact and an opinion. Write a definition for each word at the bottom of the chart. (Fact: information that can be proved; Opinion: a belief or conclusion that cannot be proved)
    • Highlight words in opinion statements to help students identify opinions. Point out that not all opinion statements will use these or similar words. Explain that “The story is boring” expresses an opinion but does not include an opinion word like the ones below.

     

     

     
     

    I think                         great                very                 all

     

    I feel                            words that end in -est             too

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Part 1

    Give each student an index card with fact written on one side and opinion written on the other side. Explain that you are going to read a passage and after each sentence, students should hold up the side of the card that identifies that sentence. Read aloud the Stingray Passage (L-3-4-3 Stingray Passage.docx). You may wish to choose another piece of text of varying complexity instead. Discuss students’ answers and resolve any disagreements. When students identify a sentence as a fact, ask them to justify their choice. Ask, “How would you prove the sentence is a fact?” If students identify a sentence as an opinion, ask, “What key word shows the sentence is an opinion?” Make note of students who are able to distinguish between facts and opinions.

    Discuss why nonfiction texts use facts and opinions. (They add interest to the piece, lend voice to the writing, and help the author persuade the reader.) Read aloud the article again without the opinions. Ask students to discuss whether the article is as interesting without the opinions.

    Part 2

    Give each student a few sticky notes and a nonfiction book that is at his/her reading level. Tell students to read their books and choose interesting facts and opinions. Have students write each fact or opinion on a sticky note. Point out that opinions might be more difficult to find and that not all books will have opinions. If their book doesn’t have an opinion, tell students to write on a sticky note an opinion of their own about the book. Similarly, a single sentence can include both a fact and an opinion.

    After students have written the facts and opinions, have partners share their answers and determine whether they agree about which statements are facts and which are opinions. Then ask students to add their sticky notes to the appropriate columns on the chart.

    Have the class review the chart and decide whether all the answers are in the appropriate columns.

    Extension:

    • On the board/interactive whiteboard, list topics related to science, such as mountains, storms, or the solar system. Provide sources to help students obtain facts about the topics. Have students write a nonfiction piece that includes both facts and opinions on one of the topics.
    • Challenge students to find nonfiction books that contain both facts and opinions. Have students identify an interesting fact and an interesting opinion in the book and share their findings with the class.

Related Instructional Videos

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Final 05/01/2013
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